Tag: hiking

Gear Review – Blue Desert SmarTube Hydration System

Gear Review – Blue Desert SmarTube Hydration System

This past weekend I was able to review the Blue Desert SmarTube Hydration System

This was a relatively inexpensive piece of gear that I think deserves a good review.   At only $23 CDN, and available on Amazon Prime, this is an easy way to add a hydration tube to your gear without dealing with a bladder.  I really like the fact that it comes with different attachments, a bite valve and a on off switch.   It is manufactured in Israel, and seems to be well made and didn’t have a funny taste.

The three different sized lids fit Nalgene bottles, and regular water bottles of different diameters.  A very simple setup where each lid ultimately stacks.   One thing I wish the kit included was a few inches of velcro material to secure it to your pack.  It works with my current ULA Circuit but it would be just a nice little bonus.

Here is what is included:

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Suction wasn’t too difficult and I found I stayed much more hydrated.   One thing I would like to try in the future is cutting the tube and hooking it up to my sawyer straw, and having it as an in-line filter.

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Happy Hiking!

Gear List 1.0 – The Big Three

The big three.  Pack, Shelter, Sleeping Bag.   The evolution of how these items change is, in my experience, due to uncomfortable trips.

I used to have this Kelty synthetic sleeping bag, however I froze my ass off in New Zealand during December 2014 when it snowed on us in the mountains.  First thing I did was sell it on Gear Trade (great site if you are in the U.S, unfortunately after moving back to Canada I don’t get the luxury of this site).

I researched and researched and went with a 20 degree ZPack bag I am fairly happy with this bag, though I wish I did the 10 degree version.  I also found a 0 degree REI bag on craigslist that had been used once for 100 dollars.  I haven’t actually used it yet as my 20F was fine for Rainier and Peru, however I did give it to my husband once when we went camping and he died of over heating 🙂 but I digress.   The ZPack’s bag is super light and fits so small.  I will do a full review on it soon.

My first tent that wasn’t a piece of crap Canadian Tire monster car camping tent was a four season Terra Nova I got on Craigslist for 100 dollars.  It has an issue where the inside of the fly sticks to itself and you have to gently peel it open for it to be spread out, but other then that, the price was a steal.  I am in love with free standing tents at this point in my backpacking adventures.   I know one day I will get a solo ultra light tent but currently free standing is my luxury, as I don’t have the extra cash for a super duper tent.

I sometimes backpack with friends that visit, as I live in the mountains, so I went with the MSR Hubba Hubba NX.  I was really on the fence between it and the Big Agnes Copper Creek UL2 but in the store I made a snap judgement by the feel of the MSR material, it just felt stronger and more durable.   I liked the two doors/vestibules and room to store my gear inside.

Packs – At one point I had 5 packs.  I have recently downsized that list.  A Deuter 35L, Deuter ACT 65+10 and a ULA Circuit pack.    The ULA is by far my favourite of the three, and I will do a review of it at a later time.   Shaving off the weight, and looking super rad!

 

 

 

Well that is out – where to go next?

PCT Section, OCT, Timberline Trail, JMT, WHW, TCT, WCT – alphabet soup!  I have read so much information on each of these treks some of it starts to mix together.  They are all on my bucket list to complete.  I wanted to pick something that would be personally challenging, not too difficult to get a permit, and fairly safe/easy access.

Time of year.  I got two weeks to play with in September, this limits some of the hikes

Pacific Crest Trail section – I was looking at doing some of the sections in Washington.  One was to hike towards the Canadian border then start heading SOBO.  Two reasons this seemed like a good idea – 1) my husband could drop me off and pick me up  2) If I ever wanted to section the whole thing, that one is kind of a pain to start.  I chose against this route though as it would be later in the season, and I wanted a loop if possible.  I was also looking at Section J in WA but some logistics with rides was daunting and I knew my husband did not want to drive 8 hours just to drop me off.

Oregon Coast Trail  and West Coast Trail – I decided I felt I was more longing for a mountain trek and wanted to stay away from the coast.  September can bring more rain, and being on the coast was not what I had in mind.

West Highland Way – Is definitely on my short list of treks to do, but the urge to keep air fare low, and there is so much to do on this continent.  Adding it to the bucket list though!

Teton Crest Trail – This one is also on my short list!  I believe I passed on this one just purely due to accessibility and I will be honest I wouldn’t be able to tell you where Wyoming was without looking at a map.  I hope as I learn and grow as a backpacker that this is one I will be able to one day see!

John Muir Trail – After going through permit anxiety, I did not want to deal with that all over again.  Such a high snow year in the Sierra I knew that there would be more pressure on late season permits.  Yes there are always walkups however I don’t like the idea of buying a plane ticket and not knowing if I will be able to do the hike (see my post about permits :P).  While looking at options in this area around the JMT I stumbled on this beauty of hike:

Big Seki Loop – this trek is around 155 miles and is a full loop,  no need for pesky drop off/pick up shenanigans!  Permit system is easy, and a chunk of the route is on the JMT! I was sold!